Monday, November 17, 2008

DSDF #11 Upside Down Walker and Charles Reid thoughts

"Upside Down Walker" 7x10 watercolor
Oh my, this week's challenge is pretty challenging. I laughed to myself when I turned my painting upright and I was a bit disoriented that the woman was facing the opposite direction from when I was painting her LOL! Ok, maybe you can understand more what I'm talking about when you visit this week's Different Strokes by Different Folks, a blog hosted by Karin Jurick.

I need to note that I've determined an additional benefit I've inherited from Charles Reid when I took his workshop. His painting technique has allowed me to not discriminate against most papers. In fact, I haven't encountered a watercolor paper that I can't paint well enough on. This paper is Portofino Aquarello Cartiera Magnani. I didn't like this paper when I used it the first time. The paper wasn't letting me get crisp edges; I guess not enough sizing. But I am perfectly happy this time around.

12 comments:

Loredana said...

Erika I can reconize your paintings in the "diff strokes from ..." blog! Yours have your personal brush print and I love them all!
Go on like this!

Theresa Bayer said...

Yes, your inimitable style is highly recognizable!

Hillary Miller said...

watery, fluid paint - so fresh and luminous. Can you explain more your comment about how Reid's approach changed your way of choosing paper?

Alice Thompson said...

You are Amazing Erika!

Erika Nelson said...

Thanks Loredana, you have always have such sweet things to say and you make this place such a happy place to post :)

Erika Nelson said...

Theresa I guess that that's a good thing huh? Galleries sort of encourage us to have continuity to our work. Definitely not what I aim for at any time, glad it happens naturally lol Theresa thanks for always having input on the entries in the blog you DA best!

Erika Nelson said...

One important tip I got from Charles Reid, which was like an AHA moment for me, was not over water the colors I load my brush with on the psper nor in the water basin. This makes my painting have more vibrance and keeps my colors looking clean unless I "add" too much color while the area is wet then it's muddy. This technique also doesn't cause any paper I use to buckle up - I haven't stretched any paper I've used with the Reid technique. Because I don't overwet my painting, this technique seems to be friendly with any paper I've used.

One of the things I try to mindful of is when I dip my brush in the basin I just dip it, not swirl. Then I tap off the excess water once then dip my brush in the color and go directly to the paper.

Erika Nelson said...

Hi Alice, you sure look familiar, do I know you from somewhere? HUGSSSSSSSS

Theresa Bayer said...

Thanks for that water explanation. You know you can lead a watercolorist to water...or is that lead them to the paper...or is it lead them to watercolors?

Anyways thanks, that's very useful info!!!

Erika Nelson said...

Hopefully you lead them not to make too much mud at the bottom of the basin since they paid a lot of money for the pigment :o)

Glad it's useful!

Lee said...

Well Done, Erika! Love your colorful version :D

RoseAnn Hayes said...

What a neat challenge that was!! Who would EVER guess you had to paint upside down!!! As usual, there's something alive and vibrant that makes me know it's one of Erika's. Something so special about your paintings - something positive and appreciative - hard to explain. Wonderful painting!